Named after Saint Andrew, the Royal Burgh of St Andrews is a coastal town in Fife, Scotland, and the home of golf. It has a population of about 18,000, and stands on the North Sea coast between Edinburgh and Dundee. It is home to Scotland's oldest university, the University of St Andrews. The town has acquired the name of "the Mecca of Golf", partly because the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, founded in 1754, exercises legislative authority over the game, and partly because of its beautiful links (St Andrews Links) (acquired by the town in 1894). Visitors travel to St Andrews in great numbers for several courses ranked amongst the finest in the world, as well as for the sandy beaches. The Martyrs Memorial, erected to the honour of Patrick Hamilton, George Wishart, and other martyrs of the Reformation epoch, stands at the west end of the Scores on a cliff overlooking the sea.

 

This Charming ancient burgh has played a leading part in the Scottish history over the centuries and was once the ecclesiastical capital of the country. Legend has it that St Regulus was shipwrecked here with the bones of St Andrew who was thereafter became the patron saint of Scotland. The towns maze of medieval, Victorian and Edwardian streets are best explored on foot. Amongst the landmarks are the castle, cathedral, Scotland's first university ( Where Prince William studied ) and the harbor. Other attractions include a theatre, Sea Life Centre, museums ( including British Golf Museum ), sandy beaches and a wide range of eating places. The surrounding area is rich in castles, country houses, parks and quaint little fishing villages.